Algeciras Ceuta: Guide to the Algeciras Ceuta Ferry Crossing

The most popular ferry crossing to Ceuta is from the Spanish port of Algeciras. The Algeciras Ceuta line is operated by Transmediterranea, Buquebus and EuroFerrys with over 20 high-speed ferry crossings daily. The journey takes 35 minutes or more, depending on the ship.

You can expect to pay around 25 Euros without a car, and 30 Euros with a car. Children aged two or less travel for free, while children between the ages of two and twelve pay 50% less.

Tickets are no problem to come by, you can just normally turn up at the port and buy them. The ferry companies and private ticket offices line up the periphery of the ferry terminal at both Ceuta (Estacion Maritima) and Algeciras.

The two periods to avoid are the end of Easter Week (Semana Santa) and the last week of August. There are massive queues of mostly Moroccan workers returning to Europe and ferries can be full for days on end.

Online booking is the best way to book your ferry simply and securely. Use a service such as Aferry to book your return Algeciras Ceuta ferry. You then simply collect your ticket at the port of crossing by showing a relevant ID (a passport).

Booking your Sete Tanger Ferry

Online booking is the best way to book your Sete Tanger ferry simply and securely.

Use a service such as Aferry to book your return ferry to Tangier. You then simply collect your ticket at the port of crossing by showing a relevant ID (a passport).

Sete Tanger Ferry: Practicalities

Disembarking at Tangier ferry port can be a slow process; with long queues for custom and passport control.

However, this could be made worse if you forget to get your passport stamped as you will be left until last by custom officials. So remember: get your passport stamped while on board the ferry. Announcements are made throughout the journey but not always in English. The important thing is to make your way to the purser’s office during your journey.

Once you go through customs, you will pass into the ferry terminal building. In and around the building, there is a bureau de change and branches of the various banks that sell dirhams at regular rates. There is also an “Assurance Frontière” office in case you need to sort out your vehicle insurance.

A word of warning about unofficial guides – or hustlers – outside the port entrance: ignore them. They are persistent and tell you all sorts of stories: they’ll guide you into town, the hotels are full and you need their services to find a place to stay etc. Don’t feel obliged to answer them, just ignore them completely and continue with your journey.